Category Archives: African Crane Conservation Programme

Cranes are spectacular, graceful, long-lived birds that have captivated people for millenia. The lifelong devotion demonstrated by mating pairs has resulted in them being symbols of peace, happiness and longevity. South Africa’s Blue Crane is prized as a symbol royalty and only Zulu Kings are allowed to wear the feathers in their headdress. Not surprisingly then, the Blue Crane is South Africa’s national bird. However, this national bird with plumes “fit for a king” is now disappearing.

Read up on the stories and tributes from our field workers all over the country working hard to save our three beautiful crane species and their habitats.

Back in the Crane World to Continue Exploring the World of Cranes

I am now part of the African Crane Conservation Programme team once again after a period of five and a half years and I will fulfil the role as the Highveld Grassland field officer. It is a great feeling to … Continue reading

Posted in African Crane Conservation Programme | Leave a comment

A Census of the Blue Cranes of the Western Cape

Blue Cranes, typically a grassland species, began to increase in the Western Cape in the 1960s, as agriculture expanded, creating artificial grasslands. Blue Cranes in the Western Cape are almost entirely reliant on agricultural fields. These fields, namely planted pastures … Continue reading

Posted in African Crane Conservation Programme | Leave a comment

Climate Change Action Plan for Nandi County Set to boost conservation of Grey Crowned Cranes and wetlands in the county

Nandi County Government is set to be among the 1st counties to develop a climate change action plan in Kenya. Wetlands ecosystems have not been spared from negative impacts of climate change. One such ecosystem is Kingwal wetland located in … Continue reading

Posted in African Crane Conservation Programme | Leave a comment

Building capacity and team work: East Africa team together in Rwanda

ICF/EWT East Africa team participated in a training on Conservation Agreements in Musanze Rwanda. It was held at Dianna Fossey Gorilla Fund Center, and facilitated by Conservation International. Attended by over 25 participants drawn from government and civil society organizations, … Continue reading

Posted in African Crane Conservation Programme | Leave a comment

Release of two Blue Cranes: A chance at a future

  In December last year, University of Cape Town student, Megan Murgatroyd – who had assisted us with the captures of Blue Cranes for our tracking project in the Western Cape – was called to assist with the identification of … Continue reading

Posted in African Crane Conservation Programme | Leave a comment

Rewards of Wattled Crane research and monitoring starting to be revealed

Monitoring of Wattled Cranes in South Africa over the past 30 years has started to show the fruit of its labor. Monitoring systems were implemented due to the extremely low numbers of the species which are primarily found outside of … Continue reading

Posted in African Crane Conservation Programme | Leave a comment

A remarkable observation

On the second week of this month January, I had plans to visit one of the communities in Lothair and I knew that I have to at least make a detour and pass at one of the Grey Crowned Cranes … Continue reading

Posted in African Crane Conservation Programme | 2 Comments

The Rugezi Marsh bio blitz and community surveys

From 11th December 2017 to 28th January 2018, in addition to Crane monitoring and attending different workshops, the team embarked on projects related to Rainforest Trust Project such as carrying out Rapid biodiversity and socio-economic surveys aimed at assessing the … Continue reading

Posted in African Crane Conservation Programme | Leave a comment

Buffer zone rehabilitation at Rugezi marsh

Most threats to nature and wildlife sustainability are anthropogenic mainly resulting from drastic increase in population size. This implies increased pressure on land use which leads to the reduction and modification of natural areas, resulting in the extinction or threat … Continue reading

Posted in African Crane Conservation Programme | Leave a comment

Buffer zone rehabilitation at Rugezi marsh

Most threats to nature and wildlife sustainability are anthropogenic mainly resulting from drastic increase in population size. This implies increased pressure on land use which leads to the reduction and modification of natural areas, resulting in the extinction or threat … Continue reading

Posted in African Crane Conservation Programme | Leave a comment